Very Early Blood Diffusion of the Active Lethal and Edema Factors of Bacillus anthracis After Intranasal Infection - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles Journal of Infectious Diseases Year : 2020

Very Early Blood Diffusion of the Active Lethal and Edema Factors of Bacillus anthracis After Intranasal Infection

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Abstract

Background: Lethal and edema toxins are critical virulence factors of Bacillus anthracis. Few data are available on their presence in the early stage of intranasal infection. Methods: To investigate the diffusion of edema factor (EF) and lethal factor (LF), we use sensitive quantitative methods to measure their enzymatic activities in mice intranasally challenged with a wild-type B anthracis strain or with an isogenic mutant deficient for the protective antigen. Results: One hour after mouse challenge, although only 7% of mice presented bacteremia, LF and EF were detected in the blood of 100% and 42% of mice, respectively. Protective antigen facilitated the diffusion of LF and EF into the blood compartment. Toxins played a significant role in the systemic dissemination of B anthracis in the blood, spleen, and liver. A mouse model of intoxination further confirmed that LT and ET could diffuse rapidly in the circulation, independently of bacteria. Conclusions: In this inhalational model, toxins have disseminated rapidly in the blood, playing a significant and novel role in the early systemic diffusion of bacteria, demonstrating that they may represent a very early target for the diagnosis and the treatment of anthrax.
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pasteur-03293185 , version 1 (20-07-2021)

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Attribution - NonCommercial - NoDerivatives - CC BY 4.0

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Clémence Rougeaux, François Becher, Pierre L. Goossens, Jean-Nicolas Tournier. Very Early Blood Diffusion of the Active Lethal and Edema Factors of Bacillus anthracis After Intranasal Infection. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 2020, 221 (4), pp.660-667. ⟨10.1093/infdis/jiz497⟩. ⟨pasteur-03293185⟩
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